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Environmental Ministries Resources


In the 19th century, Ohio became an industrial powerhouse because of its access to coal, steel and the Ohio River, one of the greatest navigable tributaries of the Mississippi. Recently, however, cities and towns throughout our state have suffered a massive loss of industry - 217,000 manufacturing jobs in the last six years alone. In addition to lost livelihood, the land, air, water and people of Ohio continue to suffer from past and current industrial pollution.

In public debate the problem is often presented as a tradeoff between jobs and the environment. To many Episcopalians, environmental stewardship means searching for economic strategies that promote both environmental health and stable employment.

A task force of Episcopal Appalachian Ministries (EAM) is researching the options available to our region. To learn more about this work, contact EAM President Mike Maloney at meamon@aol.com. Ohio non-profits which are developing innovative strategies for sustainable development include Rural Action and ACEnet, whose website addresses are listed on our Other Resources page.

The Church of the Good Shepherd in Athens has launched a Creation Justice ministry to teach parishioners about the impact of coal on Ohio, how to do an energy audit, and specific ways churches and households – particularly those with low incomes - can reduce electricity consumption. To learn about the Creation Justice curriculum, contact Good Shepherd’s rector Bill Carroll at gsrector@gmail.com.

For a list of churches in the diocese that have ministries addressing this issue, go here. You can network with them for ideas to establish or enhance your own ministries.

For other non-profit entities that may be helpful sources of information on community needs and program design, go to our Other Resources page.


Ilona Carslon of Good Shepherd, Athens and Nancy Sullivan of Our Saviour, Cincinnati studying a stream killed by sulfuric acid runoff from the Majestic Coal Mine near Athens, abandoned over 80 years ago.

Ilona Carslon of Good Shepherd, Athens and Nancy Sullivan of Our Saviour, Cincinnati studying a stream killed by sulfuric acid runoff from the Majestic Coal Mine near Athens, abandoned over 80 years ago.
 
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